How assets are valued is a changing model, and the quoted market cap of a coin is an excellent tool for benchmarking but can be misleading. Chris Burniske wrote about this on Medium. As currency use increases and utility tokens bring products to market, the economic models will be tested and as such valuation models will change. This could go either way; assets could be either under or overvalued. I believe that currencies are undervalued, and utility tokens are overvalued, hence my preference for investing in coins over tokens.
Bitcoin’s main benefits of decentralization and transaction anonymity have also made it a favored currency for a host of illegal activities including money laundering, drug peddling, smuggling and weapons procurement. This has attracted the attention of powerful regulatory and other government agencies such as the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), the SEC, and even the FBI and Department of Homeland Security (DHS). In March 2013, FinCEN issued rules that defined virtual currency exchanges and administrators as money service businesses, bringing them within the ambit of government regulation. In May that year, the DHS froze an account of Mt. Gox – the largest Bitcoin exchange – that was held at Wells Fargo, alleging that it broke anti-money laundering laws. And in August, New York’s Department of Financial Services issued subpoenas to 22 emerging payment companies, many of which handled Bitcoin, asking about their measures to prevent money laundering and ensure consumer protection.  

I am a Crypto investor, I am not a trader. I prefer to focus my time and energy on researching and understanding the macro crypto economy and investing in those assets which I believe will exist over a more extended time-frame. As the inevitable market squeeze happens, I want my investments to be those that survive, similar to those who were invested in Google and Amazon when the dot-com bubble burst.


This ‘intangible’ worth that we ascribe to currency, which accounts for the vast majority of the value of all currencies, not just bitcoin, is ultimately what makes money work. Yuval Noah Harari captures this fact very well in Sapiens, where he lays out the case that the value of a given form of money is essentially an indication of trust in that form of money. It is our shared collective trust and belief in a currency that gives it value, not its intrinsic tangible utility or anything else.
0x Aelf Aeternity Aion Altcoins Ardor Augur Basic Attention Token Bitcoin Bitcoin Cash Bitcoin Diamond Bitcoin Gold Bitshares BNB Bytecoin Bytom Cardano ChainLink Dash Decred Dentacoin DigiByte Dogecoin Dragonchain Elastos Electroneum EOS Ethereum Ethereum Classic Forks Golem GXChain Hcash Holochain ICON IOST IOTA Komodo Kyber Network Lisk Litecoin Loopring Maker Mithril Monero Nano NEM NEO OmiseGo Ontology Polymath Populous Privacy Coins Qtum Quantstamp Raiden Rchain ReddCoin Request Network Siacoin Stablecoins Status Steem Stellar Stratis Substratum Tether Tezos TRON VeChain Verge Wanchain Waves XRP Zcash Zilliqa
This can all be a little confusing and James Altucher gives a great overview in his ebook Cryptocurrencies 101. The way I see it is that each cryptocurrency can be viewed as a public company. You would do your due diligence to figure out a companies potential for growth long term before investing in its stocks and James argues that the same diligence must be applied when investing in crypto. The main question to be asked here is:
While futures products still carry unique and often significant risks, they can potentially provide a more regulated and stable environment to provide some exposure to bitcoin as a commodity as well. You should carefully consider whether trading in bitcoin futures is appropriate for you in light of your experience, objectives, financial resources, and other relevant circumstances.
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